A Glimpse into the World of Indian Dance

University of Bristol staff and students came together for the first big Global Lounge event of 2020; a Glimpse into the World of Indian Dance.

Attendees enjoyed classical dance performances and a delicious meal, organised by the Global Lounge in collaboration with students Aditya Sharma and Deepa Lakshmi.

Showtime

Just under 200 people attended the Indian dance event, held in Anson Rooms in the Richmond Building on Thursday 6 Febraury. A free delicious, authentic Indian meal and refreshments were provided after the show which many stayed on to enjoy whilst socialising and chatting to the performers.

Aditya and Deepa showcased two very distinct and popular forms of Indian dance: Kathak and Bharatanatyam. Their performances were accompanied by their stories, which explained each dance and its cultural significance, presenting a modern, fresh and personal take on the traditional roots of Indian choreography.

Meet Deepa and Aditya

Aditya Sharma approached the Global Lounge to hold this event and, along with Deepa Lakshmi, curated their performances especially for the Global Lounge, putting much time and effort into the event.

Aditya Sharma is a senior Kathak dancer with eight years of experience. He is the founder and artistic director of Yatra Dance productions, a classical dance choreography unit in Bangalore. He is currently pursuing a Master’s in Management (Marketing).

Deepa Lakshmi is a senior Bharatanatyam artist from Chennai. She has been training in the discipline since the age of four and has received many accolades. Deepa is currently pursuing a Master’s in Law.

The elaborate performances and beautiful outfits made it an immersive and entertaining experience for the audience. The dancers carefully curated their technique and style to showcase the art form in a modern and exciting way, while maintaining the roots and traditions of the choreography, music and performances.

Speaking of the success of the event, Deepa and Aditya said:

“We did not expect this kind of reaction. We were very nervous; thinking, how are [the audience] going to bounce back to us, would they be able to relate to it – we didn’t know whether they would know the history about it or not. But it just shows that art, music, dance; you don’t need a lot of commonalities to understand it. If you have the music, your feet are going to start tapping, and you start dancing – so you don’t need to know the background to enjoy anything.”

A Glimpse into the World of Indian Dance from Global Lounge on Vimeo.